A N O U S H K A

HISTORIC BUILDING DESIGN

  • I was asked to rectify a Victorian fireplace at the Lamb and Flag in line with a planning enforcement order by the local council. Engineering bricks had been laid in the firebox returns and were not in keeping with the historic building. 

The wall had to be Acrow propped and the inner hearth rebuilt using reclaimed Victorian clay bricks and hydraulic lime mortar. The old Victorian fireplace was then reinstated and a new slate hearthstone laid beneath. Its broken mantelpiece was replaced in Welsh slate and marbled to match by @swrdecart. More on that to come…
  • The last orders bell at the Lamb formerly presided over the wardroom of a ship. Sourced for the project, its clapper was fitted with a new rope lanyard. 

As the old saying goes, ‘he who rings the bell in jest buys a drink for all the rest’.
  • Art will never die! So avows the resting place of Canova’s heart, built by his students and erected in 1827. The pyramid shape (likely Masonic) and its half-open door were originally designed by Canova – not for himself, but for Titian. 

To the right, the weeping figures of Sculpture, Painting and Architecture are trailed by three genii with torches aflame. To the left, a winged Lion (Venice) sleeps beside the genius of Antonio Canova (1757–1822) – earthly torch now extinguished. 

This October the @veniceinperil.fund completed a two-year restoration of the cenotaph. Damp and saltwater had risen up into the marble causing staining and shifting of the facade. 

Final pic: Alinari, Venezia – Chiesa de’ Frari Monumento a Canova, private collection.
  • In memory of my dear friend Milton Grundy (1926–2022), I am taking his seven walks around Venice. These are mapped out in his anthology guide, now in its sixth edition. 

The first walk takes the reader to the church of San Giorgio Maggiore – designed by Palladio in 1566, with a misty view of the Lagoon from the bell tower. 

Just last month Milton finished narrating the walks for a forthcoming app. A wise and wonderful man who is much missed.
  • The Lamb and Flag has an incomplete set of Oxford college shields that used to decorate the Flag Room. The plan is to paint the rest before Christmas. Priming the canvases today…
  • Decked the pub with boughs of holly today. Beneath lives a copy of Les Vendanges (‘the grape harvest’), made to a special colourway for the room. The tapestry reads from left to right, showing the various stages of wine-making, from picking to treading to feeling the consequences. The original hangs at the Cluny Museum in Paris. 

To its left is a new stable door, freshly grained by @swrdecart. The red woollen curtain and old oak settle from @societique are also new additions. Happy advent, one and all!
  • Lime mortar has been used since 7000BC and remains unsurpassed in traditional construction for its drying properties. One has only to look at the Hill House Box to see what happens where cement harling is used in its place…

Lime mortar is moisture permeable. Cement is not. Using cement mortar creates a layer of impermeability that merely displaces the wet, putting greater pressure on the surrounding masonry or forcing the problem underground. The consequence is penetrating and/or rising damp. Lime mortar, on the other hand, will sacrificially protect the masonry from damp, since moisture can move freely through the capillaries in the lime, keeping the building dry. For the same reason, damp proofing – using plastic membranes, chemical injections and physical cement barriers – is a false economy and is actually a major cause of damp. 

With immense dedication, Mike and Jamie @heritageplastering have transformed the walls of the Lamb and Flag. Their lime rendering and plastering articulates the contours of this 16th-century building. The result has cured our damp problem and is in itself a work of art.
  • St John’s College have retained the freehold of the Lamb and Flag since 1573. Hidden away in the college archives was an unpublished picture of the Lamb in 1959. The pub was then tied to the Northampton Brewery Company (NBC), as advertised in the six-point star insignia on the St Giles’ front. 

It feels like fate to have found this commemorative jug, produced for the NBC in the coronation year. The jug would have been for sale in the pub. And now it has come home again!

Photograph reproduced with kind permission of St John’s College.
  • Collection growing…
  • Christopher Howe has made a huge impression on my approach to design. He cares about materials, about craftsmanship and about sustainability. 

I am fortunate to have spent some time under his wing and am proud to have @howelondon sconces at the Lamb and Flag. The design is strong, simple and beautiful: patinated bronze with oak pattresses.

A big thank you to all my friends at the HOWE warehouse and shop. Lampshades by @vaughandesigns
  • View from my desk today
  • Antique oak floorboards now lie in the oldest parts of the Lamb and Flag. These were laid the traditional way, using handmade cut nails, instead of screws. 

Thank you to Adam @burgess_reclamation who sourced and supplied the boards. The patina and variety of the wood is inspiring – and a welcome replacement to the previous plastic wood effect flooring. The widest boards are 330mm and have been given pride of place in the jigsaw puzzle. 

Thank you to the six chippies who worked on this job – Rich, Harri, Jon, Mick, Tyler and Dan. Their dedication to scribing and honing the boards means it all fits together beautifully.
I was asked to rectify a Victorian fireplace at the Lamb and Flag in line with a planning enforcement order by the local council. Engineering bricks had been laid in the firebox returns and were not in keeping with the historic building. 

The wall had to be Acrow propped and the inner hearth rebuilt using reclaimed Victorian clay bricks and hydraulic lime mortar. The old Victorian fireplace was then reinstated and a new slate hearthstone laid beneath. Its broken mantelpiece was replaced in Welsh slate and marbled to match by @swrdecart. More on that to come…
I was asked to rectify a Victorian fireplace at the Lamb and Flag in line with a planning enforcement order by the local council. Engineering bricks had been laid in the firebox returns and were not in keeping with the historic building. 

The wall had to be Acrow propped and the inner hearth rebuilt using reclaimed Victorian clay bricks and hydraulic lime mortar. The old Victorian fireplace was then reinstated and a new slate hearthstone laid beneath. Its broken mantelpiece was replaced in Welsh slate and marbled to match by @swrdecart. More on that to come…
I was asked to rectify a Victorian fireplace at the Lamb and Flag in line with a planning enforcement order by the local council. Engineering bricks had been laid in the firebox returns and were not in keeping with the historic building. 

The wall had to be Acrow propped and the inner hearth rebuilt using reclaimed Victorian clay bricks and hydraulic lime mortar. The old Victorian fireplace was then reinstated and a new slate hearthstone laid beneath. Its broken mantelpiece was replaced in Welsh slate and marbled to match by @swrdecart. More on that to come…
I was asked to rectify a Victorian fireplace at the Lamb and Flag in line with a planning enforcement order by the local council. Engineering bricks had been laid in the firebox returns and were not in keeping with the historic building. 

The wall had to be Acrow propped and the inner hearth rebuilt using reclaimed Victorian clay bricks and hydraulic lime mortar. The old Victorian fireplace was then reinstated and a new slate hearthstone laid beneath. Its broken mantelpiece was replaced in Welsh slate and marbled to match by @swrdecart. More on that to come…
I was asked to rectify a Victorian fireplace at the Lamb and Flag in line with a planning enforcement order by the local council. Engineering bricks had been laid in the firebox returns and were not in keeping with the historic building. 

The wall had to be Acrow propped and the inner hearth rebuilt using reclaimed Victorian clay bricks and hydraulic lime mortar. The old Victorian fireplace was then reinstated and a new slate hearthstone laid beneath. Its broken mantelpiece was replaced in Welsh slate and marbled to match by @swrdecart. More on that to come…
I was asked to rectify a Victorian fireplace at the Lamb and Flag in line with a planning enforcement order by the local council. Engineering bricks had been laid in the firebox returns and were not in keeping with the historic building. The wall had to be Acrow propped and the inner hearth rebuilt using reclaimed Victorian clay bricks and hydraulic lime mortar. The old Victorian fireplace was then reinstated and a new slate hearthstone laid beneath. Its broken mantelpiece was replaced in Welsh slate and marbled to match by @swrdecart. More on that to come…
3 weeks ago
View on Instagram |
1/12
The last orders bell at the Lamb formerly presided over the wardroom of a ship. Sourced for the project, its clapper was fitted with a new rope lanyard. 

As the old saying goes, ‘he who rings the bell in jest buys a drink for all the rest’.
The last orders bell at the Lamb formerly presided over the wardroom of a ship. Sourced for the project, its clapper was fitted with a new rope lanyard. As the old saying goes, ‘he who rings the bell in jest buys a drink for all the rest’.
4 weeks ago
View on Instagram |
2/12
Art will never die! So avows the resting place of Canova’s heart, built by his students and erected in 1827. The pyramid shape (likely Masonic) and its half-open door were originally designed by Canova – not for himself, but for Titian. 

To the right, the weeping figures of Sculpture, Painting and Architecture are trailed by three genii with torches aflame. To the left, a winged Lion (Venice) sleeps beside the genius of Antonio Canova (1757–1822) – earthly torch now extinguished. 

This October the @veniceinperil.fund completed a two-year restoration of the cenotaph. Damp and saltwater had risen up into the marble causing staining and shifting of the facade. 

Final pic: Alinari, Venezia – Chiesa de’ Frari Monumento a Canova, private collection.
Art will never die! So avows the resting place of Canova’s heart, built by his students and erected in 1827. The pyramid shape (likely Masonic) and its half-open door were originally designed by Canova – not for himself, but for Titian. 

To the right, the weeping figures of Sculpture, Painting and Architecture are trailed by three genii with torches aflame. To the left, a winged Lion (Venice) sleeps beside the genius of Antonio Canova (1757–1822) – earthly torch now extinguished. 

This October the @veniceinperil.fund completed a two-year restoration of the cenotaph. Damp and saltwater had risen up into the marble causing staining and shifting of the facade. 

Final pic: Alinari, Venezia – Chiesa de’ Frari Monumento a Canova, private collection.
Art will never die! So avows the resting place of Canova’s heart, built by his students and erected in 1827. The pyramid shape (likely Masonic) and its half-open door were originally designed by Canova – not for himself, but for Titian. 

To the right, the weeping figures of Sculpture, Painting and Architecture are trailed by three genii with torches aflame. To the left, a winged Lion (Venice) sleeps beside the genius of Antonio Canova (1757–1822) – earthly torch now extinguished. 

This October the @veniceinperil.fund completed a two-year restoration of the cenotaph. Damp and saltwater had risen up into the marble causing staining and shifting of the facade. 

Final pic: Alinari, Venezia – Chiesa de’ Frari Monumento a Canova, private collection.
Art will never die! So avows the resting place of Canova’s heart, built by his students and erected in 1827. The pyramid shape (likely Masonic) and its half-open door were originally designed by Canova – not for himself, but for Titian. 

To the right, the weeping figures of Sculpture, Painting and Architecture are trailed by three genii with torches aflame. To the left, a winged Lion (Venice) sleeps beside the genius of Antonio Canova (1757–1822) – earthly torch now extinguished. 

This October the @veniceinperil.fund completed a two-year restoration of the cenotaph. Damp and saltwater had risen up into the marble causing staining and shifting of the facade. 

Final pic: Alinari, Venezia – Chiesa de’ Frari Monumento a Canova, private collection.
Art will never die! So avows the resting place of Canova’s heart, built by his students and erected in 1827. The pyramid shape (likely Masonic) and its half-open door were originally designed by Canova – not for himself, but for Titian. 

To the right, the weeping figures of Sculpture, Painting and Architecture are trailed by three genii with torches aflame. To the left, a winged Lion (Venice) sleeps beside the genius of Antonio Canova (1757–1822) – earthly torch now extinguished. 

This October the @veniceinperil.fund completed a two-year restoration of the cenotaph. Damp and saltwater had risen up into the marble causing staining and shifting of the facade. 

Final pic: Alinari, Venezia – Chiesa de’ Frari Monumento a Canova, private collection.
Art will never die! So avows the resting place of Canova’s heart, built by his students and erected in 1827. The pyramid shape (likely Masonic) and its half-open door were originally designed by Canova – not for himself, but for Titian. 

To the right, the weeping figures of Sculpture, Painting and Architecture are trailed by three genii with torches aflame. To the left, a winged Lion (Venice) sleeps beside the genius of Antonio Canova (1757–1822) – earthly torch now extinguished. 

This October the @veniceinperil.fund completed a two-year restoration of the cenotaph. Damp and saltwater had risen up into the marble causing staining and shifting of the facade. 

Final pic: Alinari, Venezia – Chiesa de’ Frari Monumento a Canova, private collection.
Art will never die! So avows the resting place of Canova’s heart, built by his students and erected in 1827. The pyramid shape (likely Masonic) and its half-open door were originally designed by Canova – not for himself, but for Titian. To the right, the weeping figures of Sculpture, Painting and Architecture are trailed by three genii with torches aflame. To the left, a winged Lion (Venice) sleeps beside the genius of Antonio Canova (1757–1822) – earthly torch now extinguished. This October the @veniceinperil.fund completed a two-year restoration of the cenotaph. Damp and saltwater had risen up into the marble causing staining and shifting of the facade. Final pic: Alinari, Venezia – Chiesa de’ Frari Monumento a Canova, private collection.
1 month ago
View on Instagram |
3/12
In memory of my dear friend Milton Grundy (1926–2022), I am taking his seven walks around Venice. These are mapped out in his anthology guide, now in its sixth edition. 

The first walk takes the reader to the church of San Giorgio Maggiore – designed by Palladio in 1566, with a misty view of the Lagoon from the bell tower. 

Just last month Milton finished narrating the walks for a forthcoming app. A wise and wonderful man who is much missed.
In memory of my dear friend Milton Grundy (1926–2022), I am taking his seven walks around Venice. These are mapped out in his anthology guide, now in its sixth edition. 

The first walk takes the reader to the church of San Giorgio Maggiore – designed by Palladio in 1566, with a misty view of the Lagoon from the bell tower. 

Just last month Milton finished narrating the walks for a forthcoming app. A wise and wonderful man who is much missed.
In memory of my dear friend Milton Grundy (1926–2022), I am taking his seven walks around Venice. These are mapped out in his anthology guide, now in its sixth edition. 

The first walk takes the reader to the church of San Giorgio Maggiore – designed by Palladio in 1566, with a misty view of the Lagoon from the bell tower. 

Just last month Milton finished narrating the walks for a forthcoming app. A wise and wonderful man who is much missed.
In memory of my dear friend Milton Grundy (1926–2022), I am taking his seven walks around Venice. These are mapped out in his anthology guide, now in its sixth edition. 

The first walk takes the reader to the church of San Giorgio Maggiore – designed by Palladio in 1566, with a misty view of the Lagoon from the bell tower. 

Just last month Milton finished narrating the walks for a forthcoming app. A wise and wonderful man who is much missed.
In memory of my dear friend Milton Grundy (1926–2022), I am taking his seven walks around Venice. These are mapped out in his anthology guide, now in its sixth edition. The first walk takes the reader to the church of San Giorgio Maggiore – designed by Palladio in 1566, with a misty view of the Lagoon from the bell tower. Just last month Milton finished narrating the walks for a forthcoming app. A wise and wonderful man who is much missed.
1 month ago
View on Instagram |
4/12
The Lamb and Flag has an incomplete set of Oxford college shields that used to decorate the Flag Room. The plan is to paint the rest before Christmas. Priming the canvases today…
The Lamb and Flag has an incomplete set of Oxford college shields that used to decorate the Flag Room. The plan is to paint the rest before Christmas. Priming the canvases today…
1 month ago
View on Instagram |
5/12
Decked the pub with boughs of holly today. Beneath lives a copy of Les Vendanges (‘the grape harvest’), made to a special colourway for the room. The tapestry reads from left to right, showing the various stages of wine-making, from picking to treading to feeling the consequences. The original hangs at the Cluny Museum in Paris. 

To its left is a new stable door, freshly grained by @swrdecart. The red woollen curtain and old oak settle from @societique are also new additions. Happy advent, one and all!
Decked the pub with boughs of holly today. Beneath lives a copy of Les Vendanges (‘the grape harvest’), made to a special colourway for the room. The tapestry reads from left to right, showing the various stages of wine-making, from picking to treading to feeling the consequences. The original hangs at the Cluny Museum in Paris. To its left is a new stable door, freshly grained by @swrdecart. The red woollen curtain and old oak settle from @societique are also new additions. Happy advent, one and all!
2 months ago
View on Instagram |
6/12
Lime mortar has been used since 7000BC and remains unsurpassed in traditional construction for its drying properties. One has only to look at the Hill House Box to see what happens where cement harling is used in its place…

Lime mortar is moisture permeable. Cement is not. Using cement mortar creates a layer of impermeability that merely displaces the wet, putting greater pressure on the surrounding masonry or forcing the problem underground. The consequence is penetrating and/or rising damp. Lime mortar, on the other hand, will sacrificially protect the masonry from damp, since moisture can move freely through the capillaries in the lime, keeping the building dry. For the same reason, damp proofing – using plastic membranes, chemical injections and physical cement barriers – is a false economy and is actually a major cause of damp. 

With immense dedication, Mike and Jamie @heritageplastering have transformed the walls of the Lamb and Flag. Their lime rendering and plastering articulates the contours of this 16th-century building. The result has cured our damp problem and is in itself a work of art.
Lime mortar has been used since 7000BC and remains unsurpassed in traditional construction for its drying properties. One has only to look at the Hill House Box to see what happens where cement harling is used in its place…

Lime mortar is moisture permeable. Cement is not. Using cement mortar creates a layer of impermeability that merely displaces the wet, putting greater pressure on the surrounding masonry or forcing the problem underground. The consequence is penetrating and/or rising damp. Lime mortar, on the other hand, will sacrificially protect the masonry from damp, since moisture can move freely through the capillaries in the lime, keeping the building dry. For the same reason, damp proofing – using plastic membranes, chemical injections and physical cement barriers – is a false economy and is actually a major cause of damp. 

With immense dedication, Mike and Jamie @heritageplastering have transformed the walls of the Lamb and Flag. Their lime rendering and plastering articulates the contours of this 16th-century building. The result has cured our damp problem and is in itself a work of art.
Lime mortar has been used since 7000BC and remains unsurpassed in traditional construction for its drying properties. One has only to look at the Hill House Box to see what happens where cement harling is used in its place…

Lime mortar is moisture permeable. Cement is not. Using cement mortar creates a layer of impermeability that merely displaces the wet, putting greater pressure on the surrounding masonry or forcing the problem underground. The consequence is penetrating and/or rising damp. Lime mortar, on the other hand, will sacrificially protect the masonry from damp, since moisture can move freely through the capillaries in the lime, keeping the building dry. For the same reason, damp proofing – using plastic membranes, chemical injections and physical cement barriers – is a false economy and is actually a major cause of damp. 

With immense dedication, Mike and Jamie @heritageplastering have transformed the walls of the Lamb and Flag. Their lime rendering and plastering articulates the contours of this 16th-century building. The result has cured our damp problem and is in itself a work of art.
Lime mortar has been used since 7000BC and remains unsurpassed in traditional construction for its drying properties. One has only to look at the Hill House Box to see what happens where cement harling is used in its place…

Lime mortar is moisture permeable. Cement is not. Using cement mortar creates a layer of impermeability that merely displaces the wet, putting greater pressure on the surrounding masonry or forcing the problem underground. The consequence is penetrating and/or rising damp. Lime mortar, on the other hand, will sacrificially protect the masonry from damp, since moisture can move freely through the capillaries in the lime, keeping the building dry. For the same reason, damp proofing – using plastic membranes, chemical injections and physical cement barriers – is a false economy and is actually a major cause of damp. 

With immense dedication, Mike and Jamie @heritageplastering have transformed the walls of the Lamb and Flag. Their lime rendering and plastering articulates the contours of this 16th-century building. The result has cured our damp problem and is in itself a work of art.
Lime mortar has been used since 7000BC and remains unsurpassed in traditional construction for its drying properties. One has only to look at the Hill House Box to see what happens where cement harling is used in its place…

Lime mortar is moisture permeable. Cement is not. Using cement mortar creates a layer of impermeability that merely displaces the wet, putting greater pressure on the surrounding masonry or forcing the problem underground. The consequence is penetrating and/or rising damp. Lime mortar, on the other hand, will sacrificially protect the masonry from damp, since moisture can move freely through the capillaries in the lime, keeping the building dry. For the same reason, damp proofing – using plastic membranes, chemical injections and physical cement barriers – is a false economy and is actually a major cause of damp. 

With immense dedication, Mike and Jamie @heritageplastering have transformed the walls of the Lamb and Flag. Their lime rendering and plastering articulates the contours of this 16th-century building. The result has cured our damp problem and is in itself a work of art.
Lime mortar has been used since 7000BC and remains unsurpassed in traditional construction for its drying properties. One has only to look at the Hill House Box to see what happens where cement harling is used in its place… Lime mortar is moisture permeable. Cement is not. Using cement mortar creates a layer of impermeability that merely displaces the wet, putting greater pressure on the surrounding masonry or forcing the problem underground. The consequence is penetrating and/or rising damp. Lime mortar, on the other hand, will sacrificially protect the masonry from damp, since moisture can move freely through the capillaries in the lime, keeping the building dry. For the same reason, damp proofing – using plastic membranes, chemical injections and physical cement barriers – is a false economy and is actually a major cause of damp. With immense dedication, Mike and Jamie @heritageplastering have transformed the walls of the Lamb and Flag. Their lime rendering and plastering articulates the contours of this 16th-century building. The result has cured our damp problem and is in itself a work of art.
3 months ago
View on Instagram |
7/12
St John’s College have retained the freehold of the Lamb and Flag since 1573. Hidden away in the college archives was an unpublished picture of the Lamb in 1959. The pub was then tied to the Northampton Brewery Company (NBC), as advertised in the six-point star insignia on the St Giles’ front. 

It feels like fate to have found this commemorative jug, produced for the NBC in the coronation year. The jug would have been for sale in the pub. And now it has come home again!

Photograph reproduced with kind permission of St John’s College.
St John’s College have retained the freehold of the Lamb and Flag since 1573. Hidden away in the college archives was an unpublished picture of the Lamb in 1959. The pub was then tied to the Northampton Brewery Company (NBC), as advertised in the six-point star insignia on the St Giles’ front. 

It feels like fate to have found this commemorative jug, produced for the NBC in the coronation year. The jug would have been for sale in the pub. And now it has come home again!

Photograph reproduced with kind permission of St John’s College.
St John’s College have retained the freehold of the Lamb and Flag since 1573. Hidden away in the college archives was an unpublished picture of the Lamb in 1959. The pub was then tied to the Northampton Brewery Company (NBC), as advertised in the six-point star insignia on the St Giles’ front. 

It feels like fate to have found this commemorative jug, produced for the NBC in the coronation year. The jug would have been for sale in the pub. And now it has come home again!

Photograph reproduced with kind permission of St John’s College.
St John’s College have retained the freehold of the Lamb and Flag since 1573. Hidden away in the college archives was an unpublished picture of the Lamb in 1959. The pub was then tied to the Northampton Brewery Company (NBC), as advertised in the six-point star insignia on the St Giles’ front. 

It feels like fate to have found this commemorative jug, produced for the NBC in the coronation year. The jug would have been for sale in the pub. And now it has come home again!

Photograph reproduced with kind permission of St John’s College.
St John’s College have retained the freehold of the Lamb and Flag since 1573. Hidden away in the college archives was an unpublished picture of the Lamb in 1959. The pub was then tied to the Northampton Brewery Company (NBC), as advertised in the six-point star insignia on the St Giles’ front. 

It feels like fate to have found this commemorative jug, produced for the NBC in the coronation year. The jug would have been for sale in the pub. And now it has come home again!

Photograph reproduced with kind permission of St John’s College.
St John’s College have retained the freehold of the Lamb and Flag since 1573. Hidden away in the college archives was an unpublished picture of the Lamb in 1959. The pub was then tied to the Northampton Brewery Company (NBC), as advertised in the six-point star insignia on the St Giles’ front. 

It feels like fate to have found this commemorative jug, produced for the NBC in the coronation year. The jug would have been for sale in the pub. And now it has come home again!

Photograph reproduced with kind permission of St John’s College.
St John’s College have retained the freehold of the Lamb and Flag since 1573. Hidden away in the college archives was an unpublished picture of the Lamb in 1959. The pub was then tied to the Northampton Brewery Company (NBC), as advertised in the six-point star insignia on the St Giles’ front. It feels like fate to have found this commemorative jug, produced for the NBC in the coronation year. The jug would have been for sale in the pub. And now it has come home again! Photograph reproduced with kind permission of St John’s College.
3 months ago
View on Instagram |
8/12
Collection growing…
Collection growing…
Collection growing…
3 months ago
View on Instagram |
9/12
Christopher Howe has made a huge impression on my approach to design. He cares about materials, about craftsmanship and about sustainability. 

I am fortunate to have spent some time under his wing and am proud to have @howelondon sconces at the Lamb and Flag. The design is strong, simple and beautiful: patinated bronze with oak pattresses.

A big thank you to all my friends at the HOWE warehouse and shop. Lampshades by @vaughandesigns
Christopher Howe has made a huge impression on my approach to design. He cares about materials, about craftsmanship and about sustainability. 

I am fortunate to have spent some time under his wing and am proud to have @howelondon sconces at the Lamb and Flag. The design is strong, simple and beautiful: patinated bronze with oak pattresses.

A big thank you to all my friends at the HOWE warehouse and shop. Lampshades by @vaughandesigns
Christopher Howe has made a huge impression on my approach to design. He cares about materials, about craftsmanship and about sustainability. 

I am fortunate to have spent some time under his wing and am proud to have @howelondon sconces at the Lamb and Flag. The design is strong, simple and beautiful: patinated bronze with oak pattresses.

A big thank you to all my friends at the HOWE warehouse and shop. Lampshades by @vaughandesigns
Christopher Howe has made a huge impression on my approach to design. He cares about materials, about craftsmanship and about sustainability. 

I am fortunate to have spent some time under his wing and am proud to have @howelondon sconces at the Lamb and Flag. The design is strong, simple and beautiful: patinated bronze with oak pattresses.

A big thank you to all my friends at the HOWE warehouse and shop. Lampshades by @vaughandesigns
Christopher Howe has made a huge impression on my approach to design. He cares about materials, about craftsmanship and about sustainability. 

I am fortunate to have spent some time under his wing and am proud to have @howelondon sconces at the Lamb and Flag. The design is strong, simple and beautiful: patinated bronze with oak pattresses.

A big thank you to all my friends at the HOWE warehouse and shop. Lampshades by @vaughandesigns
Christopher Howe has made a huge impression on my approach to design. He cares about materials, about craftsmanship and about sustainability. 

I am fortunate to have spent some time under his wing and am proud to have @howelondon sconces at the Lamb and Flag. The design is strong, simple and beautiful: patinated bronze with oak pattresses.

A big thank you to all my friends at the HOWE warehouse and shop. Lampshades by @vaughandesigns
Christopher Howe has made a huge impression on my approach to design. He cares about materials, about craftsmanship and about sustainability. I am fortunate to have spent some time under his wing and am proud to have @howelondon sconces at the Lamb and Flag. The design is strong, simple and beautiful: patinated bronze with oak pattresses. A big thank you to all my friends at the HOWE warehouse and shop. Lampshades by @vaughandesigns
3 months ago
View on Instagram |
10/12
View from my desk today
View from my desk today
3 months ago
View on Instagram |
11/12
Antique oak floorboards now lie in the oldest parts of the Lamb and Flag. These were laid the traditional way, using handmade cut nails, instead of screws. 

Thank you to Adam @burgess_reclamation who sourced and supplied the boards. The patina and variety of the wood is inspiring – and a welcome replacement to the previous plastic wood effect flooring. The widest boards are 330mm and have been given pride of place in the jigsaw puzzle. 

Thank you to the six chippies who worked on this job – Rich, Harri, Jon, Mick, Tyler and Dan. Their dedication to scribing and honing the boards means it all fits together beautifully.
Antique oak floorboards now lie in the oldest parts of the Lamb and Flag. These were laid the traditional way, using handmade cut nails, instead of screws. 

Thank you to Adam @burgess_reclamation who sourced and supplied the boards. The patina and variety of the wood is inspiring – and a welcome replacement to the previous plastic wood effect flooring. The widest boards are 330mm and have been given pride of place in the jigsaw puzzle. 

Thank you to the six chippies who worked on this job – Rich, Harri, Jon, Mick, Tyler and Dan. Their dedication to scribing and honing the boards means it all fits together beautifully.
Antique oak floorboards now lie in the oldest parts of the Lamb and Flag. These were laid the traditional way, using handmade cut nails, instead of screws. 

Thank you to Adam @burgess_reclamation who sourced and supplied the boards. The patina and variety of the wood is inspiring – and a welcome replacement to the previous plastic wood effect flooring. The widest boards are 330mm and have been given pride of place in the jigsaw puzzle. 

Thank you to the six chippies who worked on this job – Rich, Harri, Jon, Mick, Tyler and Dan. Their dedication to scribing and honing the boards means it all fits together beautifully.
Antique oak floorboards now lie in the oldest parts of the Lamb and Flag. These were laid the traditional way, using handmade cut nails, instead of screws. 

Thank you to Adam @burgess_reclamation who sourced and supplied the boards. The patina and variety of the wood is inspiring – and a welcome replacement to the previous plastic wood effect flooring. The widest boards are 330mm and have been given pride of place in the jigsaw puzzle. 

Thank you to the six chippies who worked on this job – Rich, Harri, Jon, Mick, Tyler and Dan. Their dedication to scribing and honing the boards means it all fits together beautifully.
Antique oak floorboards now lie in the oldest parts of the Lamb and Flag. These were laid the traditional way, using handmade cut nails, instead of screws. Thank you to Adam @burgess_reclamation who sourced and supplied the boards. The patina and variety of the wood is inspiring – and a welcome replacement to the previous plastic wood effect flooring. The widest boards are 330mm and have been given pride of place in the jigsaw puzzle. Thank you to the six chippies who worked on this job – Rich, Harri, Jon, Mick, Tyler and Dan. Their dedication to scribing and honing the boards means it all fits together beautifully.
3 months ago
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